What is it?

The Spanish Democratic Memory Law (Law 29/2022), also known as the Spanish “Law of Grandchildren” allows the children or grandchildren of Spaniards to apply for Spanish nationality in the scenarios listed and described in that law

Who can apply for Spanish nationality under the Law of Grandchildren?

The following can apply for Spanish nationality:

1)     Children born outside Spain whose father/mother or grandfather/grandmother was originally Spanish.

2)     Children born outside Spain whose father/mother or grandfather/grandmother was originally Spanish but lost or renounced their Spanish nationality due to exile.

3)     Children born outside Spain to Spanish women who lost their nationality by marrying a foreigner before the Constitution of 1978 came into force.

4)     Children who were of legal age when their mother/father obtained Spanish nationality under the Spanish Historic Memory Law (Law 52/2007).

5)     People who, having been children of a father/mother who was originally Spanish, opted for Spanish nationality (not of origin) under Article 20.1.b) of the Spanish Civil Code, with the wording established in Spanish Law 36/2002.

6)     Minor children, who acquired Spanish nationality in accordance with Spanish Law 52/2007, who, in turn, opted for Spanish nationality (not of origin), by exercising the right of option, in accordance with Article 20.1.a) of the Spanish Civil Code, by being under the parental authority of a Spaniard.

 

How do I apply for Spanish nationality under the Law of Grandchildren?

Firstly, you should check that you fully comply with one of the 6 scenarios listed above. If this is the case, you should consult the Consulate of Spain website of your consular jurisdiction, go to the “Consular Services” section and from there choose “Categories of services” (Nationality), “Consular Services” (Spanish nationality under the Democratic Memory Law).

 

The application can be made directly following the instructions on the relevant Consulate website. If legal assistance is required, I recommend using a solicitor who specialises in immigration, and, more specifically in the application process for Spanish nationality under the Law of Grandchildren. I can recommend some excellent solicitors who are experts in this process, so don’t hesitate to contact me!

Which documents must I translate?

As a general rule, any documents that are to be submitted to the Consulate of Spain which were not issued in Spanish must be legalised/apostilled and accompanied by a sworn translation.

 

Some of the documents which are most often translated for this process are:

          Birth certificates

          Marriage and divorce certificates

          Death certificate

          Change of name deeds

          Naturalisation certificate

 

Since the enactment of this law, I have carried out sworn translations for over 100 clients, both directly with private individuals and via solicitors. Do you need a Sworn Translation for your Law of Grandchildren documents?